How to Make a Flat Set [Video]

Learn how to make a flat set to catch more coyotes.

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Over the years I have relied heavily on the dirt hole and flat sets when trapping coyotes.  If I was told tomorrow that I had to choose only one set for the remainder of my trapping life, I would choose the flat set.  Without question, most of my canine catches have come at a flat set.

One reason I prefer the flat over the dirt hole is because of all the non-target catches that I make at a hole set.  I use bait at my dirt holes, which seem to attract every coon, possum and skunk within a hundred-mile radius.  When I make such catches, I manage to put a smile on my face ,and remember any catch will help during these days of low fur prices.  I still catch my share of coyotes at a dirt hole, but my favorite is, and always will be a flat set.

As the name implies, a dirt hole set requires a hole with bait inserted in the hole.  The trap is bedded and covered with dirt from the hole.  A properly made dirt hole set will appear as if the dirt covering the trap came from the hole you had dug.  This is fine for foxes that bury their food, and then come back later for an easy meal.  This is something that coyotes do not do though.

With a flat set there is an actual attractor above the ground instead of a hole.  Another difference between a hole and flat set is that the trap is blended in at a flat set to match the surrounding terrain.

The visual attractor or backing at a flat set can be anything from a rock, chunk of wood, a bleached bone or a clump of grass.  When the ground has a covering of snow, I have found dark bird feathers (crow feathers) really stand out and grab the attention of a passing coyote.

As I mentioned earlier, a trap should be blended in a flat set.  I want everything to appear 100 percent natural (undisturbed in appearance) when I am finished making the set.  If I am not able to make a natural looking set all is not lost.  In a situation like this I go to the set location and prepare an area of about 15 x 15-feet to make the ground covering in that area look consistent.  Within a couple of days, this area will appear aged.  I can then go in and make a flat set that appears natural.

In this video I will show you how I make a flat set.

Loading a Coyote into a Dog Box [VIDEO]

Would you consider loading a live coyote into a dog box?

Trappers have had to relocate problem coyotes for as long as coyotes and trappers have existed.

 When most coyotes are relocated, there are many safety concerns to deal with. Coyotes are not known for their friendly behavior, and many people are scared to death of the canines.

Now, a coyote is not going to attack a human unless something is terribly wrong with the animal. Coyotes are just as scared, if not more so, than what we are of them.

I have dealt with a lot of coyotes as a trapper. Some have been very aggressive toward me, and others were not.

This trapper has to relocate a problem coyote. Normally a catch pole would be used, but not this time. The coyote was picked up with gloved hands, and placed in the dog box.

I think this guy has done this a few times.

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A Must Have First Aid Kit

As hunters, trappers, campers, fishermen, and other outdoor enthusiasts, we don’t always think about our safety.

Many of these activities take place away from civilization.  So, what do you do when an accident happens?

Hopefully, an accident will not require medical aid, but when it does, you have to be prepared.

That is where the first aid kit from 12 Survivors comes into play.  It has everything you need for minor injuries, and might save your life on serious injuries until you are able to reach medical help.

Check out this video to learn more, and be sure to follow us on Facebook.

How a Sharpie Can Help Sharpen Your Knife

A sharp knife is something every outdoorsman or woman should have.

It’s important to have a sharp knife if you spend anytime outdoors, or even for home use. The trick is getting a knife to hold a good edge. There are many tricks to sharpening a knife. Have you ever considered the benefits a Sharpie could bring to the sharpening process? Outdoor Life shares advice on using a permanent marker to get the perfect hone on any knife.

I’m such an outspoken fan of replaceable-blade knives for field dressing, caping, and butchering that I’ve apparently earned a reputation as someone who doesn’t know how to sharpen a knife.

In reality, I use folders and fixed blades for much of my hunting work, and I spend so much of my time sharpening them that I’ve learned a few tricks to hone a sharper, more durable edge. Here’s a simple new way to approach an ancient task: sharpening your knife… [continued]